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Snoqualmie Casino | Snoqualmie, WA

Project Team


CONTRACTOR:  Skanska, USA
ARCHITECT:  Bergman, Walls & Associates
MECHANICAL ENGINEER:  MacDonald-MIller

Products Designed Into Projects

  • LSD – More than 800 feet of linear slot diffusers were used in the gaming areas of the casino to supply air. Linear slot diffusers were also used in the csino’s high end restaurants, Tera Vista and 12 Moons Asian Bistro.
  • 700MA and MA DCF – Modular Core Air Diffuser, T-Bar and surface mount. Beveled frame directs air flow down and away from ceilings to prevent unsightly smudging of ceiling areas around the diffusers.
  • 600T – Lattice return air grille with extruded aluminum frame was used in the grid ceiling of the casual dining areas to return air.
  • RD – Round diffusers were used in a spiral pipe application in the 12 Moons Asian Bistro.

Overview

The Snoqualmie Casino opened its doors to the public in November of 2008 and immediately became the premiere gaming destination in the Pacific Northwest. The overall footprint of the casino is about 170,000 square feet, and 72,000 square feet is floor space dedicated to 1700 slot machines and other types of gambling. The casino features two high-end restaurants, a cigar lounge, casual dining areas and gift shop.

Casinos require a substantial amount of air movement and turns to keep air as fresh as possible. Shoemaker worked directly with the MacDonald-Miller design team to create a Linear Slot Diffuser layout that would service the entire casino floor at an optimal level. Slot and slot width selection were chosen based off of ceiling heights and assumed customer density. Air curtains were created in front of entry doors to stabilize the casino environment. The restaurants and lounge areas focused on products that could move large amounts of air at lower velocities to minimize noise criteria ratings and keep patrons from “feeling” the air conditioning and heating.